Home | Impressum | KIT

‘Changing Addis’ Lecture Series at Alliance ethio-francaise

aliance-francaise-537x221

The documentary movie series ‘_Spaces’ by Felix Heisel and Bisrat Kifle will be the basis for the ‘Changing Addis’ lecture series of the Alliance éthio-française in Addis Ababa. In three consecutive events different urgent topics will be discussed by international panelists. Dealing with the current housing situation in Ethiopia, the first evening on Tuesday 26.11.2013 at 6:30 pm is entitled “Chika bet versus Condominium”.

The evening will start with the screening of ‘Disappearing Spaces’ and ‘Emerging Spaces’ to prepare a common basis for discussion by the international panel and the audience.

We are excited to announce the participation of the following panelists:
Dr. Petra Gruber (Chair Holder of Architecture and Design III, Visiting Prof. at EIABC)
Dr. Alula Pankhurst (Country Director of Young Lives, fmr Asst. Prof. of Social Anthropology AAU)
Mathios Asfaw (General Manager of the Integrated Development Plan Project Office)
Bisrat Kifle (Acting Deputy Scientific Director of EIABC)

 
 

Urban Systems: from macro to micro and back

Lecture by Dirk E. Hebel on November 18, 2013 in the seminar ‘Information Architecture of Cities’ at the chair of Prof. Dr. Gerhard Schmitt, ETH Zurich. The elective course ‘Information Architecture of Cities’ opens a holistic view on existing and new cities. The goal is to better understand the city by going beyond the physical appearance and by focusing on different representations, properties and impact factors of the urban system.

 
 

Swiss Positions – Swiss Scales: Constructing Alternatives

Public lecture by Dirk E. Hebel at Seoul’s Yonsei University on November 15th in a series called “Swiss Positions – Swiss Scales”.

Five researchers from the Future Cities Laboratory will be giving a series of lectures and workshops in Seoul, Korea. Yonsei Symposium kicks off with FCL’s Programme Leader Prof Kees Christiaanse delivering a lecture on Open City, followed by a panel discussion with Prof Hong-Chul Rhim (Yonsei University), Prof Jae-Seung Lee (Hongik University), Prof Klaas Kresse (University of Seoul) on 24 October 2013. On  7 November 2013, FCL’s Prof Dr Gerhard Schmitt will deliver a keynote speech on Information Architecture as part of the Swiss Scales event. Architecture Tomorrow is a joint seminar featuring FCL’s Michael Budig and Marcel Bruelisauer alongside Yonsei University’s Asst Prof Ghang Lee of the Building Informatics Group and Dr Seung-Book Leigh of the Centre for Sustainable Buildings.

The Yonsei Symposium wraps up with a lecture by Prof E. Dirk Hebel of the Assistant Professorship of Architecture and Construction on “Constructing Alternatives”. FCL’s “Innovative Technologies” display will also be shown at the Swiss Scales exhibition starting 6 November at the Korean Foundation Cultural Centre.

 
 

‘Future Africa’ Seminar

Three public lectures by Dirk E. Hebel, Felix Heisel and Alireza Javadian on November, 12, 2013 at the Future Africa seminar at the Future Cities Laboratory Singapore. The seminar features Jonathan Ledgard, Africa correspondent for the Economist and head of the Afrotech Initiative, EPFL, and is moderated by Ian Smith, Principal Investigator at Future Cities Laboratory and Professor at EPFL. CoReSing will contribute 3 talks to the discussion on political risks and technology opportunities for Africa, titled: “Pedestrian life in African cities”, “Chereka Bet – Risks and opportunities of informal housing” and “High Performance Materials”.

 
 

Bamboo Concrete

Public Lecture by Dirk E. Hebel at the “Holcim Community of Practice Meeting 2013” on November 08, 2013 in Singapore. Dirk E. Hebel will introduce latest results of the research project on Advanced Fiber Composite Materials used as reinforcement systems in structural concrete.

 
 

Bamboo Fiber Reinforced Composites presented at the Composites Week in Leuven

leuven

Dr. Mateusz Wielopolski presented the research work on composite fiber materials of CoReSing at the Composites Week in Leuven, Belgium from September 16th to 20th. The symposium covered the forefront technologies in composite material research, production and manufacturing and hosted a highly prestigious assembly of internationally acknowledged experts in this field. The scientific community included participants from well-known institutions all over the world such as for example the MIT, EPFL, Stanford University, Weizmann Institute of Science and many others. Having been chosen to present the “fresh” results of the CoReSing bamboo project in front of almost 500 hundred participants was a very inspiring and motivating experience.

 
 

Movie Premiere at Goethe Institute Addis Ababa

originatingspaces_(credit_Felix_Heisel_Bisrat_Kifle)

Movie Premiere on Friday 21st June 2013 at Goethe Institute Addis Ababa at 6:30pm.

Originating Spaces by Felix Heisel / Bisrat Kifle
A part of the documentary movie series “_Spaces” on spaces appropriation in Addis Ababa.
http://www.spacesmovie.com

Addis Ababa is a city of migrants. Considering that Addis Ababa’s history reaches back only a century and most of the inhabitants of the informal areas of the city are rural migrants, the spatial arrangements of the traditional tukul actually forms part of Addis Ababa’s understanding of space. Based on the claim that traditional and cultural habits, religious and social patterns and income generating mechanisms should be the basis for new developments in Ethiopia’s capital, this movie tries to understand the origin of such conditions.

The movie “Originating Spaces” is a cinematic documentary on the use of space in the rural areas of Ethiopia. Looking at one typical tukul for the duration of 24 hours, one can notice how a single room can serve for most daily functions. Interviews with the inhabitants and experts give further insight into the topic.

This movie was kindly supported by the German Embassy Addis Ababa and the Goethe Institute Addis Ababa. For detailed program, please go here. 

 
 

Smart Cities – Smart Technologies and Materials

Public Lecture by Dirk E. Hebel and Felix Heisel at the ‘Smart Cities’ Symposium AEDES East Gallery Berlin, June 8, 2013. The N.P.O. AEDES East, under the direction of the curator Ulla Giesler, presents an exhibition and symposium as part of the Asia-Pacific Weeks Berlin 2013, with the title ‘Smart City’. For the first time, the regional focus will be on South-East Asia with particular emphasis on the formative up-and-coming generation. The exhibition concentrates on the search for intelligent solutions within an urban context. Next to the exhibition, a symposium will discuss innovative “smart city” projects from South-East Asia: buildings, planning, urban interventions, initiatives and visions for the future from internationally known experts as well as young architects from Thailand, the Philippines, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and Vietnam, who are making the cities more intelligent, effective and above all improving the quality of life for their citizens. Beyond that, the results of the student workshops, which Aedes initiated in Phnom Penh, Jakarta and Manila to generate the future city visions of the upcoming generation, will be shown. Particularly on a technological level, the fact that some emerging nations and developing countries are skipping certain development stages undergone by the classic industrialized nations, is reflected in form and utilization. However, the idea of an adaptable, integrated and networked ‘smart city’ holds opportunities and challenges for Europe too: old infrastructures, pre-existing networks and behavioral patterns, local services and governmental systems also need to be synchronized in order to retain future viability for them. The exhibition and symposium presents ideas that have relevance far beyond only South-East Asia and represent changed smart behavior in a globalized age.

 
 

Density and Destiny

Public Lecture by Felix Heisel on May, 11 2013 at the Digital Arts Week ‘A Culture of SustainAbility’ Symposium on Density and Destiny in the Marina Bay ArtScience Museum. Cities have always been dense places. With density comes diversity, stimulation, new ideas, innovation, wealth. In short, many of the good things of life. But density also brings the potential for crowding, stress, noise, ill-health, marginalization and a whole set of other urban woes. This panel offered some provocative thinking on these issues.

 
 

Density and Destiny: The Threats and Promises of Future Cities

banner_sustain3

Felix Heisel was invited to speak on the Density and Destiny Panel on May 11th at the ‘A Culture of SustainAbility’ Symposium, a part of the DAW 2013 (Digital Arts Week Singapore) at the Marina Bay Art Science Museum. Together with Prof. Stephen Cairns, Dr Alex Erath, Derek Volmer and Charlotte Malterre-Barthes, Felix discussed on the threats and promises of density in a comparative panel discussion on Singapore, Jakarta, Cairo and Addis Ababa.

Cities have always been dense places. With density comes diversity, stimulation, new ideas, innovation, wealth. In short, many of the good things of life. But density also brings the potential for crowding, stress, noise, ill-health, marginalization and a whole set of other urban woes. This panel offered some provocative thinking on these issues. A group of young scholars based in Singapore at the Future Cities Laboratory reflected on these themes from their own perspectives in transport and mobility, landscape ecology, urban heritage and territorial planning.

 
 

System Territory

Lecture by Dirk E. Hebel on April 22, 2013 in the seminar ‘Information Architecture of Cities’ at the chair of Prof. Dr. Gerhard Schmitt, ETH Zurich. The elective course ‘Information Architecture of Cities’ opens a holistic view on existing and new cities, with focus on Asia. The goal is to better understand the city by going beyond the physical appearance and by focusing on different representations, properties and impact factors of the urban system.

 
 

Waste and Want

Public lecture by researcher Marta Wisniewska at the CREATE Talks in Singapore on 19th April 2013.CREATE Talks is a discussion platform, bringing together interdisciplinary researchers of CREATE Tower institutions, such as ETH, MIT, TUM and BERKLEY. This time the event will be hosted by TU Munich and moderated by SMART, while FCL and BEARS representatives will give their talks. The ‘Waste and Want’ presentation by Marta Wisniewska will introduce the idea of smart product design and what kind of impact they can have on the immediate surrounding as their second life cycle is activated. The talk will examined exemplary refuse products as possibly one of the biggest material resource in the building industry. Some of the newest waste projects of CoreSing will be also presented.

 
 

WHAT I DID NEXT — Princeton’s alternative architectural practices

Public lecture by Prof. Dirk E. Hebel at the Princeton School of Architecture on April 3, 2013. During the academic year 2012/13 Princeton SoA will stage a series of public conversations around alternative practices in architecture through the work of 85 distinguished alumni from the last 25 years. At a moment when the profession is going through some important questions on a global scale, the series will explore the broad range of practices of recent alumni that spin from or gravitate around architecture, seeking alternatives to the established forms of architectural practice. The series will highlight Princeton’s commitment to experimental work at the edge of the discipline, and on our alumni’s engagement with a wide range of contemporary practices to outline propositions for alternative forms of practice. The lecture series intends to feature these practices as a sample of the issues that the contemporary practice of architecture has to address, to foreground relevant areas of interest and opportunity. Eight sessions will be held during the Fall ’12 term, and eight more during the Spring ’13 term, featuring different practice formats, geographies, ideologies and technologies. Dirk E. Hebel will lecture in the session: New Brave Worlds – Africa and Latin America. April 3, SoA Princeton University, Betts Auditorium, 6pm.

 
 

WASTE – an abundant building material

Public lecture by researcher Marta Wisniewska at a meeting of the Future Cities Laboratory with Shanghai Jiao Tong University in CREATE Tower, on March 22, 2013. The talk will be attended by Prof. Tong Yen Wah, the Singapore-based Co-Director of SJTU-CREATE (Shanghai Jiao Tong University), in order to elaborate on possible collaboration platform between the two institutes. SJTU–CREATE is researching two areas: Waste management and energy recovery (including studies of human behaviour) and Emerging contaminants and the effect on human health and ecology (including pollutants in reservoirs). The talk will focus on CoReSing’s approach to intelligent design of future refuse products and their second life cycle. The abundance of waste as future building material in cities will be an essential part of the presentation.

 
 

New Composite Reinforcements

Public lecture by PhD candidate Alireza Javadian at the 1st Annual International Conference on Architecture and Civil Engineering (ACE 2013) in Singapore, on March 18th, 2013. The ACE 2013 has been organized by the Global Science and Technology Forum (GTSF) and is the first international conference dedicated to both Architecture and Civil Engineering research. The conference is the premiere forum for the presentation of new advances and research results in the fields of Architecture and Civil Engineering. The conference intends to bring together leading researchers, architects, engineers and scientists in this domain of interest from around the world.  A paper on ‘Engineering Bamboo; New composite reinforcements’ by the Chair of Architecture and Construction Dirk E. Hebel of FCL Singapore was accepted by the ACE 2013 committee for presentation.

 
 

Bamboo Composite Reinforcements in Structural Concrete Applications

Public lecture by Prof. Dirk E. Hebel at the ‘Advances in Cement and Concrete Technology in Africa’ (ACCTA) conference in Johannesburg, South Africa on January 28, 2013. The ACCTA 2013 is the first international conference initiated from the SPIN project (Spearhead network for innovative, clean and safe cement and concrete technologies), that is a cooperation between European and African leading research institutions from the fields of materials research. The conference aims to cross-link experts in the field of cement and concrete technology with key players from research institutions, industries, associations and policy-making bodies. The aim is to establish a sustainable and economically efficient cement and concrete technology in Africa with impact on the world-wide. A paper on ‘Bamboo Composite Reinforcements in Structural Concrete Applications’ by the Chair of Architecture and Construction Dirk E. Hebel of FCL Singapore was accepted by theACCTA peer review group for presentation.

 
 

Bamboofying Concrete

Public Lecture by Prof. Dirk E. Hebel at the international FCL Conference – Concrete Sleeping Beauty at CREATE Singapore on 26th November 2012. Bamboo has been used as a construction material for centuries around the globe. The benefits of using bamboo are enormous: its fast growth, high tensile strength, and the capacity to capture large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere are just some of the most remarkable properties it has to offer. For decades, researchers around the world have searched for methods to activate those benefits for use within the building sector and transform bamboo from a locally applied organic material into an industrialized product. However, water absorption, swelling and shrinking behavior, durability, fungi attacks as well as chemical decomposition of bamboo have limited most of the applications so far. This research demonstrates that new bamboo composite materials, developed with Woven Strand Bamboo (WSB) technology, have the possibility to overcome most of these limitations and open new application fields within the building sector, especially in the concrete industry. The research conducted under the Professorship of Dirk E. Hebel at the Future Cities Laboratory in Singapore entails investigating the potential to replace steel reinforcements in structural concrete applications.

 
 

Engineering Bamboo

Public Lunch-Talk by Alireza Javadian at the FCL Future Cities Laboratory Singapore on 1st November 2012. Bamboo has been used as a construction material for centuries around the globe. The benefits of using bamboo are enormous: its fast growth, high tensile strength, and the capacity to capture large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere are just some of the most remarkable properties it has to offer. For decades, researchers around the world have searched for methods to activate those benefits for use within the building sector and transform bamboo from a locally applied organic material into an industrialized product. However, water absorption, swelling and shrinking behavior, durability, fungi attacks as well as chemical decomposition of bamboo have limited most of the applications so far. This research demonstrates that new bamboo composite materials, developed with Woven Strand Bamboo (WSB) technology, have the possibility to overcome most of these limitations and open new application fields within the building sector, especially in the concrete industry. The research conducted under the Professorship of Dirk E. Hebel at the Future Cities Laboratory in Singapore entails investigating the potential to replace steel reinforcements in structural concrete applications.

 
 

ADDIS 2050: an alternative pathway into Ethiopia’s future

Public lecture by Prof. Dirk E. Hebel, Felix Heisel, Bisrat Kifle, Addis alem Fekele, Tewedaj Eshetu, Yosef Teferri, and Eyob Wedesu at the Green Forum ADDIS 2050 Conference in Addis Ababa on October 09, 2012. Addis Ababa belongs to the fastest growing urban centers in the world. Migration from the rural areas as well as a massive redevelopment strategies of the City Government put the African capital under enormous pressure. Infrastructural deficiencies, water and energy shortages, environmental hazards and mobility challenges question the current modus operandi in place. Alternative pathways will be presented in this lecture which is a result of a workshop collaboration between the Green Forum Ethiopia, FCL Singapore and EiABC Addis Ababa.

Team FCL Singapore: Dirk Hebel, Felix Heisel, Marta Wisniewska, Alireza Javadian, Gerhard Schmitt, Stephen Cairns, Remo Burkhard, Eva-Maria Friedrich, Matthias Berger, Stefan Mueller Arisona, Ludger Hovestadt, Jorge Orozco, Alex Erath, Max Hirsh, Sonja Berthold, Ying Zhou, Edda Ostertag, Naomi Hanakata, Lindsey Ann Sawyer, Cheryl Song, Noor Faizah Binte Othman, Kevin Lim, Amanda Tan

Team EiABC: Joachim Dieter, Bisrat Kifle, Addis alem Fekele, Tewedaj Eshetu, Yosef Teferri, Eyob Wedesu

Team Green Forum/Heinrich Boell Foundation: Patrick Berg, Ayele Kebede, Jonas

 
 

Learning from Singapore

Public lecture by Felix Heisel at the Green Forum ADDIS 2050 Conference in Addis Ababa on October 09, 2012. Out of Singapore’s breathtaking development over the past 50 years, the lecture focuses on two mayor characteristics of urban planning: the incredible success story of the Housing & Developing Board (HDB) as well as the concept of a “City in the Garden”. Today, more than 85% of Singapore’s 5.3 million inhabitants are home owners, due to an inventive strategy implemented already in the 1960ies. Identification of the home owners with the nation-state is almost guaranteed, since almost everybody is owning a share of Singapore, whereby national economic growth enhances the value of private property. Also during the last 50 years, even so the built mass in Singapore grew constantly, the green area did as well and is covering today more than 50% of the island, making Singapore one of the greenest cities world-wide. The lecture will introduce the necessary decisions that were taken over the last five decades in order to achieve such high standards.

 
 

Cities as proto-typologies

Public lecture by Prof. Dirk E. Hebel at the 2012 Academia Engelberg Congress in Switzerland on September 14, 2012.  The 11th Dialogue on Science will focus on the issue of rapid urbanization and its consequences for everyday life in cities around the world. With this congress the Academia Engelberg Foundation asks how might the disciplines of architecture, urbanism and the built environment sciences respond to the challenges of rapid urbanization?

The Chair of Architecture and Construction at the Future Cities Laboratory in Singapore concentrates its research on ‘alternative modern’ construction materials. The ‘alternative’ aspect of this focus emerges from an exploration of the possibility of knowledge transfer, which could change the way we think about vernacular or traditional building materials. One material, maybe the most neglected building material in the world so far, has the chance to change our perspective: Bamboo, “the next super-material” as it was called out in a recent BBC documentary. It is growing exactly in those regions around the equator belt, where most developing territories are to be found today. Bamboo is a very fast growing and affordable natural resource, which has outstanding constructive qualities, superior to wood and, looking at tensile capacities, even to steel.

Re-inventing and overcoming its role as a old fashioned vernacular building material of the South, it could start to establish a knowledge transfer from South-to-South or South-to-North and reverse the traditional model. The talk will argue, that through knowledge transfer, there is a chance to combine and therefore revaluate globally applied building materials with local available substances and knowledge from the South. It is proposing the possibility for a ‘reverse’ or ‘alternative modernism’, whereby developed countries might start to learn and gain from a knowledge developed in the ‘South’.

 
 

Constructing Alternatives

Public lecture by Prof. Dirk E. Hebel at the 2012 FCL/ETH conference in Zurich, Switzerland on September 10, 2012.  Multiple centers, hubs and nodes increasingly supplement traditional city centers, regional territories and urban clusters. These are embedded in a network of infrastructures to form complex polycentric urban regions that extend far into once rural hinterlands. Research from the Future Cities Laboratory in Singapore will be confronted with research from ETH Zurich and elsewhere in order to promote an exchange of knowledge and to bring the Future Cities Laboratory’s work to the attention of a larger audience in Switzerland. Following the question on how a well-tempered environment can be achieved in different situations of affluence, material resources and technological development, Dirk Hebel will introduce first outcomes of his research in Singapore.

 
 

UN-Habitat Conference: The Urban Future

Public forum discussion with Prof. Dirk E. Hebel at the UN-Habitat Confrenece: The Urban Future in Naples, Italy, September 04, 2012. The overarching theme of the sixth session of the World Urban Form “The Urban Future” clearly signifies the need to anticipate, imagine and plan for the future in order to shape it in sustainable ways. The rapid pace of change from global to local levels and related complexities, uncertainties and connectivity necessitate cities to think ahead into the future and adapt their plans, policies and interventions accordingly. Promoting socially equitable, economically viable and environmentally balanced cities requires decision-makers to systematically examine and anticipate future trends, conditions and drivers of change. To become prosperous, innovative and competitive, cities need to critically examine possible and probable scenarios so as to work towards their preferred future.
The future offers enormous potential for achieving sustainable development targets in cities as it can be shaped through actions and decisions taken today.

While the term “future” bears several uncertainties, systematically analyzing the future presents an opportunity to identify alternatives that can guide today’s policies and development at the city, regional and national scales. Futuring is the methodical exploration, creation, and testing of a range of alternative futures to inform decision making, and allow better decisions to inform a better tomorrow. Thus, the objective of future analysis and visioning is not to project the “right” future or make the “right” decisions” but to make more informed decisions in relation to many possible projected scenarios.
Globally, cities have engaged in futuring processes at different scales and in various urban sectors so as to design policies and interventions that take future opportunities and risks into consideration. The results of these processes have not been without challenges, especially when it comes to being translated into action. In many other instances, cities seldom engage in foresight exercises and may be more occupied with addressing current and immediate needs and challenges, especially in developing countries. There is thus a clear need to rethink the role of futuring in urban management and governance to enable cities to better prepare for a complex, uncertain and rapidly changing global context.

UN‐Habitat has recently launched an urban futures initiative called “Futurban” to integrate futuring into urban policy and decision making processes. Futurban undertakes research to anticipate and analyze future trends, conditions and events in order to advance knowledge on the future of cities and contribute to enhanced policy and decision making. In addition, based on a rigorous analysis of alternative scenarios, Futurban assists cities to envision their preferred urban future and set realistic milestones for achieving it through innovative and visionary strategies. By building foresight in policy and decision making processes, it strengthens the ability of cities to capitalize on strategic levers to proactively shape their future.

 
 

Alternative Building Materials

Public lecture by Felix Heisel on Alternative Building Materials at the Global Cross-Disciplinary Tournament on Friday 28th, 2012.

The international conference Global Cross-Disciplinary Tournament (GXT) 2012 brings together 20 delegates from four universities – NUS USP, the Australian National University, Peking University, and Oxford University – to discuss problems and propose catalysts for change related to this year’s theme, The Future of Cities. The delegates from these universities are meeting in teams over 10 days in July to propose a cross-disciplinary catalyst with the potential to change a specific issue related to the future of cities in 30 years. They will each bring their unique domain knowledge and cross-cultural experiences in generating their ideas and in giving their presentations at the final symposium during their stay in Singapore.

 
 

Disappearing Spaces

Public lunch-talk by Felix Heisel at FCL Singapore on July 12, 2012. Addis Ababa, unlike many other African cities, has a history and city fabric to learn from. Even if the physical conditions of the informal settlements are very poor, the social networks, as well as spatial and cultural values developed and embedded in these areas are worth the preservation and study. Due to the current redevelopments, these parts of the city will change for good within the next years. Hence, now is the right time to document a century old way of living in Addis Ababa. We believe that its informal sector can teach important lessons about the use of architecture and its social role.

This movie is an cinematic documentary on the use of space in the informal parts of Ethiopia’s capital. Looking at one typical house for the duration of 24 hours, one can notice how a single room can serve for most daily functions. Interviews with the inhabitants and experts give further insight into the topic. “Disappearing Spaces” is the first of a series of documentaries on spatial developments in Addis Ababa.

 
 

Swiss Ethiopian Research & Science Forum 2012

The Embassy of Switzerland in Ethiopia with the Swiss Agency for Developmemnt and Cooperation under the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs invited Prof. Dirk E. Hebel as an representative of ETH Zuerich for a symposium on the future Swiss Ethiopian Research & Scientific Cooperation for Development held on July 28, 2012 in Addis Ababa. The forum will focus on Ethiopian experience and implementation of partnerships in Research & Science and on future fields, scope and modalities of Research & Science cooperation for development.

 
 

Which kind of more?

Public lecture by Prof. Dirk E. Hebel at the Design Research Society Biennial International Conference in Bangkok on July 04, 2012. The conference hosts 500 world’s leading design academics and professionals for five days of discussion and debate with a special emphasis on the role of design in sustainable development. The conference will provide a platform for educationalists and practitioners in all design fields to share their experiences and develop plans for the future.

 
 

From Bottles to Buildings

Public lecture by Prof. Dirk E. Hebel at the Asia Green Youth Challenge in Singapore on July 2nd, 2012, a conference held as part of the WasteMET Asia Conference 2012 at Marina bay Sands. The Asian Green Youth Challenge (AGYC) is an environmental initiative by youth for youth to imagine and realise sustainable and innovative projects. Having recognised the mounting environmental challenges that Asia faces, AGYC seeks to promote ground-up innovation that is financially and environmentally sustainable.

 
 

Proto-typologies: building cities out of moving targets

Public lecture by Prof. Dirk E. Hebel at TU Delft on May 31, 2012. The modernist ‘proto-type’ followed the idea of one ‘ideal’ model configuration, applied in a serial way, while the ‘proto-typology’ defines a flexible and heterogenous form of organization, which can be changed and readjusted instantly and serve different cultural as well as contextual conditions. It is a process rather than a product. The lecture will show different case studies of prototypologies errected in the last years at the Urban Laboratory ETHiopia.

 
 

Building Ethiopia: activate local construction technologies and materials

Puplic lecture by Prof. Dirk E. Hebel on March 29, 2012 at the Goethe Institute Bangalore, India, organized by MoD Institute Berlin/Bangalore in the series ‘Talk of the Town’. The lectures series, under the banner of the year of Germany and India 2011-2012: Infinite Opportunities, is organized around the themes of ‘SEE’, ‘ACT’ and ‘BUILD’ respectively, to critically address various issues related to urban transformation in India in applied and innovative ways. The first lecture began with Richard Saul Wurman’s famous call for ‘making the city observable’ to interrogate different practices of seeing the city through cartography and other visual means and how those shape our everyday urban experiences and decisions. The second lecture ‘ACT’ will gather urban practitioners and actors to discuss and compare various strategies and tactics undertaken by them to intervene in city processes. The discussion will focus on how specific ways of ‘acting’ or ‘intervening’ in the city can create or dismantle urban hierarchies, and also what examples of ‘acting’ in the city can be found in the urban discourse in India.

 
 
       
 
 
 
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie
Fakultät für Architektur
Institut Entwerfen und Bautechnik

Fachgebiet Nachhaltiges Bauen
Englerstr. 11, Geb. 11.40, Raum 25
D-76131 Karlsruhe
 
 
 
Recent Publications:  
 

    Reservoir Building: Towards an Idea of Abundant Pertinence

    September 20, 2017


    Hebel, Dirk E. (2017). Reservoir Building: Towards an Idea of Abundant Pertinence, in Embodied Energy and Design: Making Architecture Between Metrics and Narratives, ed. David Benjamin, 107–116. New York, N.Y, USA and Zürich, Switzerland: Columbia University GSAPP, Lars Müller Publishers.

     
     

    Beyond Mining – Urban Growth: The Architectural Innovation of Cultivated Resources through Appropriate Engineering

    September 10, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E., Philippe Block, Felix Heisel and Tomas Mendez Echenagucia (2017). Beyond Mining – Urban Growth: The Architectural Innovation of Cultivated Resources through Appropriate Engineering, in IMMINENT COMMONS: THE EXPANDED CITY, 116–127. Seoul, South Korea: Actar Publishers, Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism 2017.

     
     

    Alternative Baumaterialien

    August 9, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E., Felix Heisel and Aurel von Richthofen (2017). Alternative Baumaterialien, in BodenSchätzeWerte: Unser Umgang mit Rohstoffen, focusTerra, ed. focusTerra, 214–217. Zürich, Switzerland: vdf Hochschulverlag.

     
     

    Building from Waste – the Waste Vault

    August 8, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E., Marta H. Wisniewska and Felix Heisel (2017). Building from Waste – the Waste Vault, in IMMINENT COMMONS: Urban Questions for the Near Future, eds. Alejandro Zaera-Polo, Hyungmin Pai, and urbanNext. Seoul, South Korea: Actar Publishers, Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism 2017.

     
     

    Shifting Paradigms: From Excavation to Cultivation

    August 8, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E., Nikita Aigner, Dustin Fleck, Felix Heisel, Alireza Javadian, Simon Lee, Philipp Müller, Aurel von Richthofen, Karsten Schlesier and Marta H. Wisniewska (2017). Shifting Paradigms: From Excavation to Cultivation, in Future Cities Laboratory: Indicia 01, 191–199. Singapore-ETH Centre, Signapore: Lars Müller Publishers.

     
     

    Circular Economy Pedagogical Methods

    June 13, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E., Patrick Chladek, Amelie Fibicher, Felix Heisel, Philippe Jorisch, Hans-Christian Rufer and Marta H. Wisniewska (2017). Circular Economy Pedagogical Methods, by Professor Dirk Hebel,: in The Re-Use Atlas: A Designer’s Guide towards a Circular Economy, ed. Duncan Baker-Brown, 110–113. London, UK: RIBA Publishing.

     
     

    Cultivated Building Materials: Industrialized Natural Resources for Architecture and Construction

    June 12, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E. and Felix Heisel (2017). Cultivated Building Materials: Industrialized Natural Resources for Architecture and Construction. Birkhäuser: Berlin.

    The 21st century will face a radical paradigm change in how we produce construction materials – a shift towards cultivating, breeding, raising, farming, or growing future resources. The book presents innovative cultivated building materials, like cement grown by bacteria or bamboo fibers as reinforcement for concrete. The book aims to build a bridge from scientific research to product development and application.

     
     

    Die Zukunft ist aus Bambus

    June 11, 2017

    Reimann, Milena (2017). Die Zukunft ist aus Bambus. Rheinische Post: Düsseldorf.

    Aus dem holzähnlichen Gras werden immer mehr Produkte gefertigt – vom Fahrrad übers Kleid bis zum Toilettenpapier. Jetzt wollen Forscher sogar moderne Häuser aus dem Werkstoff bauen. … Auch Dirk Hebel ist begeistert von dem Rohstoff. Er ist Architekturprofessor mit dem Schwerpunkt “Nachhaltiges Bauen” am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie. Statt wie bisher Häuser aus Stein und Stahl zu errichten, wollen er und sein Team Gebäude aus gepressten Bambusfasern bauen. More information here.

     
     

    Wie Sand am Meer?

    June 1, 2017

    Hellge, Anna (2017). Wie Sand Am Meer?, in: natur (07/17): 44 – 49.

    Nicht nur Wüstensand aus Mauretanien macht beim Bauen oder im Küstenschutz Probleme. Dirk Hebel, Professor für nachhaltiges Bauen an der Uni­versität Karlsruhe, erklärt das Phänomen: ,,Zwar ist Sand genau die Zutat, die der Beton benötigt – aber Sand aus der Wüste eignet sich nicht zur herkömmli­chen Betonproduktion.” Stattdessen sind dafür Sän­de aus Meeren, Seen oder Flüssen nötig. Der Grund dafür liegt im Detail: ,,Sie müssen sich diese Sande nur einmal unter der Lupe anschauen”, sagt Hebel. „Sie werden feststellen, dass die Körner, welche durch Bäche und Flüsse in unsere Meere getragen wurden, scharfkantig und gebrochen sind.” Nur die­se kantigen Körnchen können durch hohe Reibungs­widerstände Druckkräfte aufnehmen und weiterlei­ten und machen -salopp gesagt -Beton überhaupt erst belastbar. In der Wüste schmirgeln sich die Sandkörner dagegen glatt und sind zur Betonherstel­lung so nicht brauchbar. ,,Wüstensand verhält sich wie eine Hand voll Murmeln”, erklärt Hebel.

     
     

    ADDIS 5000 – Design Studio Publication

    May 12, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E., Patrick Chladek, Amelie Fibicher, Philippe Jorisch, Felix Heisel, Sophie Nash, Hans Rufer, Gian Salis, Marta H. Wisniewska (2017). ADDIS 5000, Design Studio Publication Fall 2014, 01/05, ETH Zürich, Switzerland.

    Addis 5000 proposes the creation of 5000 new living units in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa in close collaboration with the city administration. Faced with an increasing unavailability of globally-favoured and expensive building materials and construction methods, the city government is in desperate need of alternative housing solutions that embody the country’s long and complex history, the immense cultural identity, and the unique characteristics of a society under transformation.

     
     

    Ressource Schweiz – Design Studio Publication

    May 12, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E., Patrick Chladek, Amelie Fibicher, Philippe Jorisch, Felix Heisel, Sophie Nash, Hans Rufer, Gian Salis, Marta H. Wisniewska (2017). Ressource Schweiz, Design Studio Publication Spring 2015, 02/05, ETH Zürich, Switzerland.

    Ressource Schweiz applies the fundamental principle of exploring local possibilities and opportunities within the territory of Switzerland. Students are partnered with a Swiss craftsperson specializing in a distinct craft utilizing a unique local building material. Intensive visits to the craftsperson and associated region are required to gain an understanding of the material’s application and manufacture as well as to establish a dialogue between the craftsperson, the site, the material and the student.

     
     

    Village School Project Cambodia – Design Studio Publication

    May 12, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E., Patrick Chladek, Amelie Fibicher, Philippe Jorisch, Felix Heisel, Sophie Nash, Hans Rufer, Gian Salis, Marta H. Wisniewska (2017). Village School Project Cambodia, Design Studio Publication Fall 2015, 03/05, ETH Zürich, Switzerland.

    Village School Project Cambodia operates within one of the most crucial fields of sustainable action: the education sector in developing territories. Based on a thorough understanding of an appropriate pedagogical model developed in collaboration with the Pedagogical University of Applied Science in Zürich, students are asked to design an educational facility for 1000 students in a rural area, just north of the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh.

     
     

    Building for Disassembly – Design Studio Publication

    May 12, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E., Patrick Chladek, Amelie Fibicher, Philippe Jorisch, Felix Heisel, Sophie Nash, Hans Rufer, Gian Salis, Marta H. Wisniewska (2017). Building for Disassembly, Design Studio Publication Spring 2016, 04/05, ETH Zürich, Switzerland.

    Building for Disassembly, aims to produce a paradigm shift within the construction industry. Instead of working within a linear system of “produce-use-discard”, students are asked to develop new construction methods and principles which follow the concept of a circular economy. Designing for disassembly is perceived as a proactive solution to both the shortage of resources and the minimization of waste. Cities can therefore be simultaneously consumers and suppliers of resources and use themselves for their own reproduction.

     
     

    Living Lab Zakynthos – Design Studio Publication

    May 12, 2017

    Hebel, Dirk E., Patrick Chladek, Amelie Fibicher, Philippe Jorisch, Felix Heisel, Sophie Nash, Hans Rufer, Gian Salis, Marta H. Wisniewska (2017). Living Lab Zakynthos, Design Studio Publication Fall 2016, 05/05, ETH Zürich, Switzerland.

    Living Lab Zakynthos asks the students the most obvious and yet most difficult question operating in the field of sustainable construction: how to define their own and individual hypothesis of the theme. Seeking clarity in this definition, students are asked to design a hotel complex on the west coast of the Greek island of Zakynthos, on a site sloping down towards the Ionic Sea.

     
     

    Neformálnosť v knihe i krajine

    April 3, 2017

    Czafík, Michal (2017). Neformálnosť v knihe i krajine, ARCH Magazine 1-2/2017(Architektúra a bývanie): 59–60.

    Book Review of Lessons of Informality in Slovakian Magazine ARCH:
    Who would I recommend the book to? All who have the desire to indirectly find their way into life in a country that is still covered with a riddle of mystery. Urban designer, architect, sociologist, cultural scientist, anthropologist … I could continue to name myself. This confirms only one fact, that architecture has long been not only a mono-, but a multidisciplinary issue.

    We say thank you!

     
     

    Fantastic materials – and where to find them

    March 7, 2017

    Buxton, Pamella (2017). Fantastic Materials – and Where to Find Them, RIBA Journal Magazine.

    Scientists are developing super materials from some most unlikely beginnings. Could spider silk ever be a useful (human) building material? How about transparent wood, ‘printed’ sandstone, or a bio-plastic derived from crabs hells? These and plenty more seemingly fantastical notions will be explored from February at The Building Centre’s SuperMaterial exhibition. (…) Architect Dirk Hebel has developed a new material made from bamboo fibres and resin that could be used to replace steel rebar.

     
     

    Pull-Out Test for Bamboo Composite Reinforcement at the Advanced Fibre Composite Laboratory

    January 18, 2017

    Bildschirmfoto 2017-01-18 um 09.13.44
    National Environmental Agency Singapore (2016). Pull-Out Test for Bamboo Composite Reinforcement at the Advanced Fibre Composite Laboratory, in Singapore’s Second Biennal Update Report 2016 – Under The United Nations Framework Convention On Climate Change, 23. Singapore: National Environmental Agency Singapore.

    The first research programme under the Singapore-ETH Centre, the Future Cities Laboratory (FCL), combines science and design to develop new knowledge, technologies, and approaches for a sustainable urban future with an Asian perspective. In addressing the challenges of rapid urbanisation, the FCL research team has developed innovative urban solutions in areas including urban design, mobility and transportation, low-energy cooling systems, and sustainable construction materials, among others.

     
     

    Ein Holz für alle Fälle

    December 4, 2016

    scan__20161220092401

    Laukenmann, Joachim (2016). Ein Holz für alle Fälle, Süddeutsche Zeitung, 3./4. December 2016: 36–37

    Bambus ist eigentlich gar kein Holz im engeren Sinne, sondem gehört zur Familie der Süßgraser. Auf der Basis von Bambusfasern und verschiedenen Harzen wurde zusammen mit der Firma Rehau und dem Future Cities Lab der ETH Zürich ein neues Komposit-Material hergestellt. Dieses Material weist äußerst hohe Festigkeitswerte auf und ist aufgrund der Witterungs-beständigkeit gut für Außen-anwendungen geeignet.

     
     

    Der Materialmann

    October 18, 2016

    hochparterre-dirk

    Herzog, Andres (2016). Der Materialmann, Hochparterre 10/16(Dirk Hebel: von der Expo-Wolke zum Pilzstein): 12–15.

    Seit der Expo-Wolke erforscht der Architekt Dirk Hebel, wie wir mit Wasser, Pilzen oder Bambus bauen könnten. «Ich möchte aus Pilzen ein Haus wachsen lassen», sagt Dirk Hebel mit einem selbstverständlichen Grinsen auf dem Gesicht, als wäre die Rede von Backsteinen. Der ETH-Professor steht in seiner Wunderkammer im kühlen HIT-Gebäude auf dem Hönggerberg in Zürich. Im Gestell hinter ihm lagert Hebel die Materialien, die er derzeit auf der Architekturbiennale Venedig im Rahmen der Ausstellungsreihe «Time Space Existence» zeigt: Gemahlener Bauschutt, der mit gewachsenem Kalkstein zusammengehalten wird. Stühle, gepresst aus Altpapier. Beton, der sich dank eingelagerten Bakterien selber heilt, wenn sich Risse bilden. «Reporting from the front», so das Thema der diesjährigen Biennale, heisst bei Hebel: die Front von morgen.

     
     

    Elsevier: Bond-behavior study of newly developed bamboo-composite reinforcement in concrete

    August 17, 2016

    Elsivier Bond Behavier
    Javadian, Alireza, Dirk E. Hebel, Ian F.C. Smith, Mateusz Wielopolski (2016). Bond-behavior study of newly developed bamboo-composite reinforcement in concrete, Elsevier, Volume 122, 30 September 2016, London, Pages 110–117

    Bamboo is a rapid growing, affordable and available natural resource in many developing countries. It is potentially superior to timber and to construction steel in terms of its weight to strength ratio. A new technology has been developed in this research to preserve the mechanical properties of bamboo and to enhance physical characteristics through composite action for application in structural concrete. The goal of present work is to investigate the bonding properties of a newly developed bamboo-composite reinforcement in concrete through pull-out testing. Various coatings are applied to determine bonding behavior between concrete and newly developed bamboo-composite reinforcement. The results of this study demonstrate that bamboo-composite reinforcement without coating develops adequate bonding with the concrete matrix. However an epoxy based coating with sand particles could provide extra protection without loss of bond strength.

     

     
     

    Waste Vault ETH Zürich Pavilion

    August 8, 2016

    a&c423

    Heisel, Felix and Choi Mi-Ho(2016). Waste Vault ETH Zürich Pavilion, A&C Architecture and Culture Upcycling(423): 102–113.

    For the IDEAS CITY Festival in New York City in May 2015, a team of ETH Zürich’s Professorships Dirk E. Hebel and Philippe Block constructed a 90m2 pavilion made from recycled beverage packaging, aiming to show the immense potential of waste for the construction sector. The article includes an interview with project architect Felix Heisel.

     

     
     

    Engineering bamboo – a green alternative under basic research Part 3

    July 1, 2016

    au550

    Hebel, Dirk E., Felix Heisel, Alireza Javadian, Mateusz Wielopolski, Simon Lee, Philipp Müller, Karsten Schlesier (2016). Engineering bamboo – a green alternative under basic research Part 3, in: a+u 550, Feature: Vo Trong Nghia Architects, 2016:07, Japan Architecture and Urbanism, Tokyo, Japan

    Essay Series: Engineering bamboo – a green alternative under basic research Part 3, Professorship of Architecture and Construction Dirk E. Hebel: The Advanced Fibre Composite Laboratory in Singapore investigates new methods and procedures to produce a high-strength building material out of natural bamboo fibres. If successful, the research could provide a starting point for the introduction of new and adapted technologies that take a widespread natural resource as their basic premise and give reason for people who live in the tropical belt to foster one of the most common plants in the sub-tropical climate zone.

     

     
     

    Der Sandkrieg hat begonnen

    June 13, 2016


    Knellwolf, Bruno (2016). Der Sandkrieg hat begonnen, in St. Galler Tagblatt: 19–20

    Wider Erwarten wird Sand immer mehr zum raren Gut. Bereits spricht man vom Sandkrieg und der Sandmafia, die den Handel mit dem knapper werdenden Baustoff betreibt. Dirk E. Hebel und Felix Heisel zeigen an der Biennale in Venedig Alternativen.

     

     
     

    Engineering bamboo – a green technical alternative Part 2

    May 30, 2016

    a+u2

    Hebel, Dirk E., Felix Heisel, Alireza Javadian, Mateusz Wielopolski, Simon Lee, Philipp Müller, Karsten Schlesier (2016). Engineering bamboo – a green economic alternative Part 2, in: a+u 549, Feature: RCR Arqitectes, 2016:06, Japan Architecture and Urbanism, Tokyo, Japan

    Essay Series: Engineering bamboo – a green technical alternative Part 2, Professorship of Architecture and Construction Dirk E. Hebel: At the Advanced Fibre Composite Laboratory in Singapore, a new mechanical processing for raw bamboo has been developed, which leads to a fibrous material with physical features that are mainly defined by the bamboo species. This material is used as a natural fibre source for the production of a high-tensile fibre reinforced composite material aiming for the construction industry. Thereby, controlling the parameters of the underlying hot press fabrication process turned out to be crucial for a systematic tuning of the tensile capacities of the resulting composite materials.

     

     
     

    Lessons of Informality

    May 30, 2016

    Heisel Cover

    Heisel, Felix and Bisrat Kifle (eds.) (2016). Lessons of Informality: Architecture and Urban Planning for Emerging Territories – Concepts from Ethiopia.  Basel: Birkhäuser.

    Never before have cities been so important. Today, cities are home to the majority of the world’s population, accommodate most of global production, and are the goal of millions of migrants around the world. Yet, increasingly, our cities are growing informally, planned and built by non-professionals. Informality resembles an evolutionary process more than a simple absence of rules. In itself, informality is neither illegal, nor dysfunctional, nor indicative of poverty; in fact, its actors, skills and capital are probably our best chance to solve the world’s growing housing crisis.

    The book includes a DVD of _Spaces, a series of six documentaries on informality in Addis Ababa.

     

     
     

    Cities of Change Addis Ababa: second and revised edition

    May 30, 2016

    612wCWPGLOL._SX387_BO1,204,203,200_

    Hebel, Dirk E. and Marc M. Angelil (eds.) (2016). Cities of Change Addis Ababa, 2nd and Revised Edition. Basel: Birkhäuser, 2nd and rev. ed.

    Aiming to identify sustainable strategies―rather than upholding an a priori vision of an ideal city―the publication acknowledges the heterogeneous conditions of urban territories. This revised edition highlights questions of method and procedure that can be transferred to other ‘cities of change’, and covers recent developments, such as the increasing influence of China in African countries or the chances of high-density, low-rise developments.

     

     
     

    Forschung: Der Pilz, aus dem die Mauern sind

    May 30, 2016

    beobachter
    Paganini, Romano (2016). Forschung: Der Pilz, aus dem die Mauern sind, in: Beobachter 11/, Zürich, Switzerland

    An der ETH Zürich erforschen Architekten und Ingenieure das Potenzial von Pilzen. Sie sollen einst Plastik ersetzen. Die Prototypen sehen aus wie hellbraune Backsteine und riechen nach Grosis Estrich. Doch sie könnten das Industriematerial der Zukunft sein. «Es ist ein extrem vielversprechendes Material, dessen Potenzial wir noch gar nicht richtig abschätzen können», sagt ETH-Architekt Felix Heisel schwärmend.

    Read full article here.

     

     
     

    Stavění z odpadu (Waste Vault)

    May 30, 2016

    Bildschirmfoto 2016-06-20 um 12.59.28
    Hebel, Dirk E., Marta H. Wisniewska and Felix Heisel (2016). Stavění z odpadu, ERA21 03/2016 Udržitelný nerůst: 62–63.

    Zahrada a pavilon budoucnosti ETH Curych na festivalu IdeasCity v New Yorku
    en— Building from Waste. Future Garden and Pavilion ETH Zurich at IdeasCity, New York Dirk E. Hebel a Philippe Block / Katedra architektury ETH Curych

    For the IDEAS CITY Festival in New York at the end of May, ETH Zurich constructed a 90 m2 pavilion made from recycled beverage packaging. The project, led by ETH Zurich`s Assistant Professor Dirk E. Hebel and Professor Philippe Block, aims to show the immense potential of waste for the construction sector.

     

     
     

    Dirk E. Hebel: «Architektur ist eine Lebensphilosophie»

    May 30, 2016

    coop hebel

    Ettlin, Anna (2016). Dirk E. Hebel: «Architektur ist eine Lebensphilosophie», in: coop Zeitung, 23.05.2015, Zürich, Switzerland

    Dirk E. Hebel forscht über Baumaterialien der nächsten Generation. Sind Bambus, Pilze und Müll eine Alternative, wenn Stahl und Beton knapp werden? Er beschäftigt sich mit der Stadt der Zukunft, als Assistenzprofessor an der ETH Zürich und am Future Cities Laboratory in Singapur. Bekannt wurde Dirk E. Hebel (45) vor allem durch seine Arbeiten mit ungewöhnlichen Baumaterialien, die demnächst an der Architektur-Biennale in Venedig präsentiert werden. Wir müssen im 21. Jahrhundert zwei grosse Fragen beantworten: die Frage nach der Energie und die Frage nach den Ressourcen. In den letzten 150 Jahren haben wir uns angewöhnt, Materialien aus der Erdkruste zu entnehmen, zu brauchen und dann wegzuwerfen. Schon nach dieser relativ kurzen Zeit stossen wir damit an die Grenzen des Möglichen. Sand, der wichtigste Zuschlagstoff des Betons, wird zum Beispiel zunehmend knapp. Allein Marokko hat in den letzten Jahren 50 Prozent seiner Strände verloren. So geht es nicht mehr. Wir müssen Ansätze entwickeln, wie und mit welchen Materialien wir in Zukunft bauen wollen.

    Read full article here.

     

     
     

    Kontextwechsel = Ideentransfer

    May 24, 2016

    archithese
    Himmelreich, Jørg, Elias Baumgarten (2016), Kontextwechsel = Ideentransfer, in: Archithese Bildungslandschaften, Juni-August 2016, Zürich, Switzerland

    In seinen Studio für Architektur und Konstruktion an der ETH Zürich möchte Dirk Hebel Studierende für einen verantwortungsvollen Umgang mit gegebenen Ressourcen sensibilisieren und daraus neue Entwurfs- und Konstruktionsprinzipien ableiten, welche den vorgefundenen Kontext mit seinen verfügbaren Materialien, Wissen, klimatischen Bedingungen, sowie kulturellen und sozialen Gefügen respektieren.